October 28, 2011 at 5:13 pm

New Google TV Includes These 13 Music Apps

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We’ve learned more about Google’s exciting plan to launch third-party Android and web apps for Google TV, available in the Android market.

Google spokesman Jacques Hebert tells Evolver.fm that the following apps will be included when the new Google TV rolls out starting next week. We can’t wait to try it out, because television will be an excellent platform for music and other apps:

The update to Google TV will include Android and web apps from over 100 different partners. Over 50 of these partners have developed new apps for the update. A few examples of these partners include CNN Money, Flixter, Fox Business, IGN Pro League, IMDB, Karaoke Channel, Khan Academy, Kraft Cooking, Motortrend, NPR, Plenty of Fish, Qello, QVC, the Big Picture (Boston Globe), Thuuz, and Wall Street Journal, to name a few.

Examples of music apps include Pandora, Google Music App, Karaoke Channel, Napster, Qello, Rhapsody, Classical TV, Vevo, Mosh Cam, Slacker Radio, TuneIn Radio, Baeble Music and LP33.

Here’s what each of these apps will do once the new Googe TV operating system starts rolling out next week, so far as we can tell, in alphabetical order. According to Hebert, Google’s music app offerings will include these 13 music apps (up from four), but we suspect that number will soon balloon as more developers realize they can tweak Android apps and build web apps in order to appear on Google TVs:

Baeble Music: Indie music videos produced professionally and submitted by bands and labels

Classical TV: This one brings not only classical but also jazz, opera, and a smattering of longer-in-the-tooth pop music.

Google Music App: At the very least, this will let you play tunes from your Google Music locker. And if Google launches a full-fledged music service, as some think it will, we imagine this app will hook into that too.

The Karaoke Channel: Alert the neighbors.

LP33.tv: Since 2008, this online music video repository has been gathering new music footage.

Moshcam: Go Australia! This antipodean resource, whose motto is “the gig is up” (nice), packs a healthy selection of live music by indie and other bands you may have heard of. We wonder how the worldwide licensing will work out for this, but that’s another headache.

Napster: Napster has been acquired by Rhapsody, so it’s not worth putting much thought into this one.

Pandora: Pandora, which is regularly used by approximately one out of every ten Americans according to what Pandora told Evolver.fm, will now also appear on Google TV. Like the others, it will let you access the same account you use on your computer and phone. (Pandora was already on Google TV.)

Qello: Qose there? This service charges $2 to rent you a single concert for seven days, or $5/month for access to everything on the service. Unlike some of the others listed here, it costs money, but in return you get to watch HD concerts by bands like The Rolling Stones, The Doors, Tupac, Eminem, Kenny Chesney, and Sugarland.

Rhapsody: For $10/month, users of this Facebook-compatible subscription service will be able to play just about any song or album on-demand, as well as playlists created on other platforms. In addition, they can probably read Rhapsody’s custom-written reviews and biographies.

Slacker Radio: Not only does Slacker serve up artist-themed radio stations with more control and granularity than Pandora does (much to the famous delight of industry critic Bob Lefsetz), but it recently added the ability to function as a full, on-demand subscription service along the lines of Rhapsody.

TuneIn Radio: Thanks to the inclusion of this popular terrestrial radio app, Google TV users will be able to pull in over 50,000 FM radio stations from all over the world, no rabbit ears required. (Google TV already had Tune In.)

Vevo: Stop complaining that “MTV doesn’t show videos anymore.” Vevo has a similar selection, and it’s all free and on-demand. (Vevo was also included at launch.)