May 18, 2011 at 7:08 pm

7 Ways to Listen to Music for Your Mood

mood musicThese days, music fans have a crazy amount of options these days when it comes to finding something new to listen to.

Just for starters, you could turn to interactive radio services like Pandora, music subscriptions like Spotify, or any of the innovative music discovery services we profiled last month.

But as always, when it comes to music apps, there are more to choose from. A different breed of music service goes beyond matching music to your personal taste by reacting to your particular mood — or trying to, at least.

We sifted through mood music apps for the web and iOS to find the ones below, which we cheerily (as opposed to angrily) present below for your entertainment regardless of the mood you are in or that which you hope to attain.

Happy (or whatever) listening!

Musicovery lets you choose what to listen to using a colorful, two-dimensional graph (iPhone, web).

Ghostly Discovery provides a smart, glowing interface to new music from a cutting edge record label (iPhone, web).

MoodAgent plumbs your own music collection to try to make the best playlist for how you’re feeling (Android, iPhone, Nokia, Winamp, Windows).

Steremood provides a bunch of mood tags; pick the one that sounds like what you want to hear, and you’re up and running (Android, iPhone, web).

The simple-yet-effective Bipolar Radio streams songs from Rdio starting with any artist, after which you can steer its programming by clicking either a smiley face for more upbeat tunes, or an expressionless face to head in a more chilled-out direction (web).

Moodstream, designed by Getty Images to showcase the various media it licenses, offers a bewildering experience for the adventurous (and short-attention-spanned) listener (web).

Thesixtyone’s big, beautiful web-based music streamer not only helps you discover brand new bands you’ve never heard of, but it classifies them by mood too, making it even easier for you to find stuff you like (web).

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Photo courtesy of Flickr/The DLC

  • Geoffrey Manlangit
  • Andrew Albinson

    You spelled stereomood wrong. Really? The entire point of 1/7 of your article and you SPELLED IT WRONG.

    nice.